Archive for the ‘tickets’ Category

Disney Detours – Budgeting Disney, Part Four: Purchasing Tickets

July 27, 2009
Image © Disney.

Analyzing Walt Disney World ticket packages when you’re watching your money.

By Blake

Originally posted July 27, 2009.

It’s time for another edition of Budgeting Disney, a special series walking through the steps of planning a Walt Disney World vacation in the midst of keeping a close track of where your money is going. So far we’ve looked at finding deals, deciding when to visit, and choosing a resort to stay at.

Before we delve into purchasing theme park tickets, I’d like to point out that a bargain package has just been announced. Guests visiting Walt Disney World for at least five nights/five days during October 1 through November 24, as well as November 29 through December 17, get select dining free if they book their trip by September 26. Full details can be found here. (Note: You may have heard that this package was exclusively for guests with a Disney Rewards Visa card, though that is not the case anymore!)

Free dining is back . . . again! Image © Disney.

Moving on, after picking your resort, the next issue in planning a Walt Disney World vacation is to decide is what type of ticket package to purchase. A regular, one-day theme park ticket currently costs $75. However, if you’re visiting for more than one day, the price per day gradually decreases.

A regular, standard base ticket allows guests to visit one theme park per day. You can’t switch parks in the middle of the day, but you can leave the park for a break and come back later to that same park. Honestly, if you want to spend as little money as possible, a standard base ticket is the option that you should choose.

The standard base ticket package is the least expensive WDW vacation package, and has guests visiting one theme park per day. The Tree of Life at Disney’s Animal Kingdom is shown here. Image © Disney.

However, there are several other optional ticket choices to “splurge” on if you want. Each has their own benefits, but when you’re watching your money, you really have to ask yourself if any of the other packages are worth it.

The first option is the Park Hopper add-on, which allows guests to visit more than one theme park per day. In the past, my family has used this to perhaps spend the day at one park, and then head to another park to see some sort of nighttime show. Other times we’ve just gotten “bored” with a park and decided to hightail it over to another area of WDW. However, looking back at our last trip, I don’t think we’ll be eager to use a Park Hopper anytime soon. There was nothing wrong with the actual ticket package itself, but we were using it so much that we were rushing ourselves around from place to place and from park to park. Not only were we exhausted by the time the trip was over, but we didn’t take the time to appreciate the surroundings and the excellent atmosphere that Disney provides. Instead we were too concerned about where we were headed to next. If you don’t overuse it, the Park Hopper can be nice, but it can also stress you out at times. Consider that before you make your decision to add it on or not.

The next package to look at is the Water Park Fun & More option. It includes admission to Disney’s Blizzard Beach water park, Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon water park, DisneyQuest “virtual theme park” at Downtown Disney, ESPN Wide World of Sports, or golfing at Oak Trail. I’ve never visited Typhoon Lagoon, Wide World of Sports, or Oak Trail, but I have visited both Blizzard Beach and DisneyQuest. While I enjoyed both experiences very much, I don’t think they’re worth adding the Water Park Fun & More option to our vacation package EVERY trip. They might be exciting to visit every now and then, but honestly it can be difficult squeezing in time for the four theme parks during a vacation, let alone the other various activities Walt Disney World has. If you truly think you’ll want to spend a full day at a water park, play at Wide World of Sports or Oak Trail, or play some very involved virtual games at DisneyQuest during your trip, go for it. Personally more often than not, I’d rather just stick to the theme parks.

Typhoon Lagoon is one of Disney’s two water parks that guests can experience in the Water Park Fun & More package. Image © Disney.

Now we come to the “no expiration” option. Most Walt Disney World tickets will expire fourteen days after their first use, whether they’ve been maxed out or not. However, with the no expiration add-on, they’ll never go bad. Of the packages we’ve mentioned so far, I feel that this one is the most beneficial, especially if you plan on visiting Walt Disney World in the future (as in, after the trip you’re planning now).

Remember how ticket prices per day decrease for every additional day you purchase? Well, let’s say you buy tickets for ten days in the parks, but you’re only planning to stay for five days this trip. With the no expiration add-on, those five leftover unused days of tickets will still be good if you plan to visit in a few years (or, for that matter, any time in the future at all). However, you have to consider whether or not you can financially shell out that amount of money at once.

What’s more, the tickets will end up being less expensive than they would have been if you bought them in a few years, for two reasons: 1.) They’ll have decreased in price per day because you bought many of them at one time, and 2.) Disney tends to slightly raise their ticket prices about every year or so. Guests traveling during the hurricane season (late August through October) might want to seriously consider the no expiration option, as will guests that might have to go back home for some sort of emergency situation. Otherwise, only get no expiration if you’re sure you’ll be returning, and even then there’s still the issue of paying all of that money at once.

The last package that we’re going to look at is the Annual Pass. For locals, or for those that visit Walt Disney World more than once a year, an Annual Pass includes year-round visits to the parks. Regular Annual Passes cost $414 for ages three through nine and $469 for ages ten and up. The Water Park Fun & More option is also available for Annual Passes (for $528 ages three through nine and $599 ages ten and up). For guests that go to WDW often, the Annual Pass can be a great deal.

Buying Walt Disney World tickets can be puzzling, but ultimately it comes down to how much you think your family will benefit from each of the different add-on packages. If you want to spend as little money as possible, go for the standard base ticket. If you’d like to experience some of the other activities WDW has – like water parks or sports – the Water Park Fun & More add-on might be for you. If you think you’re going to be visiting WDW on a yearly basis, purchasing the no-expiration option and buying more tickets than you plan on using this time might be wise (only if you can financially support that decision, though). Lastly, if you’re a frequent guest to WDW and visit more than once a year, you might want to consider an Annual Pass. Whatever ticket package Walt Disney World guests decide on, make sure to be conscious of your money, and to fully consider whether or not each add-on will be worth it to your family.

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By Blake; posted July 27, 2009. All images © Disney.

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